Pinxterbloom Azalea, or Pink Azalea, features fragrant clusters of cotton-candy pink to white flowers, which bloom in April to early May, before leaves emerge. The nectar is a valued food source for bumblebees. Plant it in well-drained soil — it does not tolerate “wet feet,” and poor drainage leads to root-rot. Pink Azalea spreads by stolon (a horizontal plant stem or runner that takes root at points along its length to form new plants). Use it in shrub borders, foundation plantings, shade gardens, natural areas, or as a hedge. As with many Azaleas and Rhododendrons, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

Great Laurel is a broadleaf evergreen shrub or small tree. Clusters of white to purplish-pink flowers bloom in June, providing a valued food source for bumblebees. Use Great Laurel in shrub borders, foundation plantings, and natural areas around your yard. As with many Azaleas and Rhododendrons, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

Catawba Rhododendron is a broadleaf evergreen shrub. Large clusters of lilac to purple to rose flowers bloom April-June, providing a valued food source for bumblebees. Use Catawba Rhododendron in shrub borders, foundation plantings, and natural areas around your yard. As with many Azaleas and Rhododendrons, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

Dwarf Azalea is a low-growing, colony-forming shrub. Long-stalked clusters of fragrant white-pink flowers bloom April-May and provide a valued food source for bumblebees. Use Dwarf Azalea in shrub borders, foundation plantings, and natural areas of your yard. As with many Azaleas and Rhododendrons, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

Sweet Azalea features clusters of white-pink flowers with protruding red stamens, which bloom June-July. Its nectar is a valued food source for bumblebees. Leaves turn reddish-purple in the fall. Use Sweet Azalea in shrub borders, foundation plantings, and natural areas in your yard. As with many Azaleas and Rhododendrons, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

Handsome Harry lives up to its name! Rose-pink to pale-pink petals surround yellow stamens to create an attractive flower, which blooms in May-September. It is cross-pollinated by bumblebees, which forage for its nectar and pollen. Its leaves contain “pulegone,” and can be rubbed on your skin to repel mosquitos. Handsome Harry is an important host plant to larvae (caterpillars) of the Large Lace Border moth (Scopula limboundata). Old seed heads offer shelter for over-wintering beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds in the spring. Handsome Harry prefers wet peat or sandy acidic soil. It grows best on the edges of moist woodlands or meadows. Plant Handsome Harry in masses along borders, beds, and moist natural areas of your yard. It propagates through self-seeding.

Clustered Mountainmint is a wildlife-friendly perennial, which features tubular pink flower clusters blooming July-September. It tolerates bright shade, but produces more flowers in full sun. It grows in densely-leaved clumps that may spread vigorously. Clustered Mountainmint is a valued nectar source for butterflies and bees. It attracts beneficial predatory insects that prey on garden pests. Clustered Mountainmint is most attractive when massed, and can be used in your herb garden, butterfly garden, or in mixed borders around your yard.

Yoshino Cherry is a small to medium, deciduous, flowering tree. It features fragrant, pink or white flowers, which bloom March-April. The nectar provides a food source for butterflies and bees. Yoshino Cherry has a weeping form. It tolerates heat and humidity, but not drought. Fall foliage is yellow and bronze. Use Yoshino Cherry as a specimen plant in your yard or around your patio.

Portulaca is a long-blooming, succulent annual with a low, spreading form. It comes in a variety of colors (including red, orange, yellow, and white) and blooms from June to frost. Portulaca tolerates heat, humidity, and poor, dry soil, making it an excellent plant for seaside gardens and New Jersey yards. Use Portulaca as an edging plant, in rock gardens, containers, hanging baskets, or as a groundcover in your yard.

Common Ninebark is a wildlife-friendly, spreading, deciduous shrub, featuring clusters of pinkish-white flowers which bloom May-June. Flowers provide an excellent nectar source for native bees. Drooping clusters of red fruit offer food for birds in the summer. Common Ninebark is valued for its exfoliating (peeling) bark, which reveals layers of reddish-brown inner bark, offering winter interest. This plant tolerates poor soil conditions. Use Common Ninebark in your shrub border, or as a hedge or screen in your yard.