Purple Pitcherplant is native to New Jersey bogs. It features a distinctive, red flower, which blooms on a single scape (stalk) May-June; the flower may persist through the summer. This carnivorous plant receives nutrients from captured insects and other invertebrates; however, it also photosynthesizes. It requires a consistently moist, acidic, humus-rich bog environment, and may be considered high-maintenance for the typical gardener. Purple Pitcherplant can be grown at home in containers that offer the conditions that meet its specific needs.

Scarlet Sage is a tender perennial, grown as an annual. Its showy, red flowers blooming June to frost provide a nectar source to a host of pollinators, including bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Use it in mixed borders and containers, or plant it around your yard for a burst of summer-long color.

Salvia,or Sage, is a large genus offering many species in various sizes and colors. Sage is a wildlife-friendly plant, which is very attractive to hummingbirds, numerous native butterfly species, native bees, bumblebees, and honey bees. Sage is typically a low-maintenance plant tolerant of dry soil. It offers consistent summer blooming. Use it in mixed borders and butterfly gardens, or to provide colorful accents around your yard.

Sugarcane Plumegrass is a showy, tall grass, which grows best in wet areas in full sun. Clusters of coppery-rose flowers bloom in October, followed by fluffy, peach-colored seed heads. Fall foliage color is brown with shades of red and purple. Use Sugarcane Plumegrass as an accent plant, or plant in masses. It is a good grass for rain gardens. Sugarcane Plumegrass may be difficult to find commercially. Tell your local garden center or nursery about your interest in this plant.

Korean Rhododendron is a deciduous shrub, which is unusual for Rhododendrons. It features rosy-purple flowers which bloom in early spring, from mid- to late-March to early April. Situate this plant in a northern exposure in the yard or garden to avoid blooming too early, as buds are susceptible to frost. Use Korean Rhododendron in shrub borders, foundation plantings, or natural areas. As with many Azaleas and Rhododendrons, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

Catawba Rhododendron is a broadleaf evergreen shrub. Large clusters of lilac to purple to rose flowers bloom April-June, providing a valued food source for bumblebees. Use Catawba Rhododendron in shrub borders, foundation plantings, and natural areas around your yard. As with many Azaleas and Rhododendrons, all parts of this plant are poisonous.

Swamp Chestnut Oak is a medium to large, deciduous tree of the white oak group. It is monoecious; yellow male catkins and red female flowers bloom separately on the same tree in April-May. It has chestnut-like, oblong, toothed leaves, which are shiny and green above and gray and hairy underneath. Fall foliage is dark red. This tree performs best in full sun, but tolerates some shade when young. It tolerates occasional wet soils; however, continuously wet soils cause root rot. Swamp Chestnut Oak is very tolerant of urban conditions and has medium to high wind resistance. It may take 20-25 years for the tree to mature and bear acorns. When present, acorns ripen in September-October and provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Swamp Chestnut Oak provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Use it as a street tree or shade tree in your yard, neighborhood park, or in natural areas.

Black-jack Oak is a small to medium, deciduous tree of the red oak group. It is monoecious; male catkins and female spikes bloom separately on the same tree in May. Its dark green leaves are leathery with 3-5 bristle-tipped lobes. Foliage turns brown in fall. Black-jack Oak grows in sandy, infertile soil where it is hard for other plants to grow. The acorns provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Black-jack Oak provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Use it in natural areas or native plant gardens around your yard. This tree is worth saving if it is already growing in your yard.

Scrub Oak, or Bear Oak, is a small, shrub-like, deciduous tree in the red oak group. It is monoecious; separate male and female catkins appear on the same tree. Its smooth leaves have 3-7 bristle-tipped lobes. Fall foliage is reddish-purple. Biennial acorns are bitter and reportedly only eaten by bears. It provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Scrub Oak is a host plant for butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars), including Sleepy Duskywing (Erynnis brizo) and Eastern Buckmoth (Hemileuca maia). Use it as a street tree or shade tree in your yard, neighborhood park, or natural area.

Southern Red Oak is a medium to large, deciduous tree. It is monoecious; separate male and female catkins appear on the same tree April-May. This tree tolerates drought, as well as brief flooding. Acorns provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous inconspicuous insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Southern Red Oak provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Use Southern Red Oak as a street tree or shade tree for your large yard, park, or natural area.