Woolgrass needs wet, partly shady conditions. This wildlife-friendly plant has seeds and roots that are eaten by waterfowl. It also provides waterfowl with cover and nesting sites. It is a host plant for butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars), including the Dion Skipper (Euphyes dion). Use Woolgrass in rain gardens, moist low areas, and along edges of ponds or streams, where it can provide erosion control.

Black Willow is a fast-growing, flowering tree. Yellow-green flowers bloom April-May, providing a nectar source for native bees, honeybees, bumblebees, and beneficial predatory insects, which prey on garden pest insects. It is a host plant for butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars), including Viceroy (Limenitis archippus), Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa), Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis), Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus), and Acadian Hairstreak (Satyrium acadica). Black Willow has attractive, deeply furrowed bark. Use it as specimen tree in moist areas around your yard, or along streambanks for erosion control.

Smooth Sumac features yellowish-green flowers which bloom June-July. it is dioecious, with male and female flowers on separate plants. Both male and female plants are needed to produce fruit. Female flowers lead to large clusters of red berries which ripen in August; the berries are an attractive food source for birds. Nectar offers food for butterflies and bees. Smooth Sumac is a host plant for butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars) including Hairstreak (Hypaurotis spp.). Fall foliage is yellow to orange-red-purple. Use Smooth Sumac for mass plantings in dry, nutrient-poor soil areas. It will spread to form colonies.

Winged Sumac features yellowish-green flowers blooming July-August. It is dioecious, with male and female flowers on separate plants. Both male and female plants are needed to produce fruit. Flowers provide nectar for native bees. Fertilized female flowers lead to large clusters of edible, sour, red berries which ripen in August. The berries provide a valuable food source for birds. Fall foliage is a rich red, crimson, and scarlet. Winged Sumac provides habitat for birds, bees, and wildlife. Use Winged Sumac in dry rocky places, coastal gardens, along stream banks, in naturalistic plantings, and in large areas of your yard. It will spread to form colonies.

Black Oak is a medium-tall, deciduous tree of the red oak group. Its shiny dark green leaves have deeply cut lobes. The bark is almost black on mature trunks, giving it its common name. It prefers moist, organically-rich soil, but tolerates nutrient-poor, dry soil. Acorns provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Black Oak is a host plant for butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars), including Edwards Hairstreak (Satyrium edwardsii). It provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Use Black Oak as a street tree, shade tree in large lawns or parks, or in natural areas around your yard.

Red Oak is a medium-sized, deciduous tree. It is monoecious; insignificant separate male and female catkins appear in spring. The acorns mature in early fall and provide food for birds and wildlife. Fall foliage is russet-red to bright-red, but occasionally yellow-brown. It prefers fertile, dry, sandy soil. Red Oak provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Red Oak is a host plant to butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars), including Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus). Use it as a specimen in your yard, a street tree, or lawn tree.

Chestnut Oak is a medium-large, deciduous tree of the white oak group. It has oblong, toothed leaves, which turn orange-yellow or yellow-brown in fall. The acorns provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. It provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Use Chestnut Oak as a street tree or shade tree, and in parks or natural areas.

Pin Oak is a medium-sized, deciduous tree of the red oak group. It is monoecious; greenish-yellow flowers bloom on separate male and female catkins in April. Its dark green leaves have five bristle-tipped lobes, and turn deep red in fall. It tolerates poorly-drained soils and some flooding. It may take 15-20 years until the tree matures to bear acorns, which provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Pin Oak is a host plant for butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars), including Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus). It provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Use Pin Oak as a shade tree in the yard, park, or natural area, or as a street tree.

Chinkapin Oak is a medium-sized, deciduous tree of the white oak group. It is monoecious; greenish-yellow flowers bloom on separate male and female catkins in April as leaves emerge. It has narrow, oblong, toothed leaves. Fall leaf color is variable, usually yellow-brown. It may take 30 years for this tree to mature to bear acorns, which provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Chinkapin Oak is a host plant for butterfly and moth larvae (caterpillars), including Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus). It provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Chinkapin Oak is a low-maintenance, long-lived tree. This attractive tree is worth saving if it is already growing in your yard. Use it as a shade tree in large yards and parks, or in natural areas.

Black-jack Oak is a small to medium, deciduous tree of the red oak group. It is monoecious; male catkins and female spikes bloom separately on the same tree in May. Its dark green leaves are leathery with 3-5 bristle-tipped lobes. Foliage turns brown in fall. Black-jack Oak grows in sandy, infertile soil where it is hard for other plants to grow. The acorns provide food for birds and wildlife. Oaks are host to numerous beneficial insects, which in turn provide food for birds. Black-jack Oak provides nesting space, cover, and shelter for wildlife. Use it in natural areas or native plant gardens around your yard. This tree is worth saving if it is already growing in your yard.