Virginia Wild Rye is a cool season perennial bunch grass featuring silvery blue-green leaves in spring and brilliant golden brown leaves in fall.

Pussy Willow has attractive early spring blooming “furry” flowers resembling a tiny cat’s paw.

Spike-like flowers bloom in late summer to early autumn; seedheads resemble a bottle brush and offer interesting texture in the garden.

Clumping sedge with fine textured leaves that grows in wet conditions; wildlife friendly!

Tall native perennial with greenish-yellow whorls of flowers that are attractive to bees and butterflies.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit is one of New Jersey’s most uniquely structured plants and deserves a closer look!

The Zinnia genus contains many species with flowers ranging in sizes and colors, including red, yellow, pink, orange, and purple. Zinnia is one of the easiest annuals to grow. Each brightly colored, daisy-like flower blooms on a single, erect stem. The flowers bloom from June to frost and attract many pollinators, including hummingbirds and butterflies. They also make excellent fresh-cut flowers. This annual will re-seed itself for next season. It is susceptible to powdery mildew; minimize overhead watering and wetting leaves to avoid this disease. Use Zinnia in mixed borders, beds, butterfly gardens, and for colorful accents around your yard. Smaller varieties can be used for edging and in containers.

Summer Grape is a woody deciduous vine. Its flowers are fragrant, but not showy; they bloom May-June, and attract pollinating bees. Summer Grape is primarily grown for its edible, blue-purple fruit, but its foliage is also attractive in summer, and the shaggy bark of the woody vine provides ornamental interest in winter. The fruit provides a food source for birds and wildlife, September-October. Plant Summer Grape strategically to grow on a trellis, fence, or other structure in your yard. The flexible vines can be used to make decorative wreaths.

American Bladdernut is a fast-growing, suckering, small tree or large shrub. Greenish-white, bell-shaped flowers bloom April-May, leading to showy fruit in the fall. The dried seed capsules, called “bladders,” hang in clusters from the tree and offer late fall and early winter interest. The dried seed capsules also add ornamental value to dried flower bouquets.